Fabulous Finds Friday — Blingy Bling Bling

Oh, how I love these sheets of self-adhesive vinyl jewels from The Buckle Boutique! Check out this Fabulous Find:

jewels 404 Happy DSC_0302

Isn’t this a sparkly card? These bedazzling gems are actually vinyl sheets, so they are easy to cut and oh, so pretty and sparkly. It’s hard to believe they are not actual rhinestones.

(Background large canvas stripe S5433 by Hero Arts; Happy sentiment by Technique Tuesday; Spellbinders Fancy Tags 2 die edged in Brilliance Gold.

Take a gander at the multi-colored sheet:

jewels 404 hellosunshine DSC_0307
(Delicate Flower background CG476 from BasicGrey/Hero Arts stamped in Marvy grey; cardstock from Stampin’ Up!; cloud die from My Favorite Things on Core’dinations cardstocks whitewash; Hello Sunshine CL600 by Hero Arts/BasicGrey)

Here’s another card, with the strips cut even narrower:

jewels happy world 404 DSC_0304

And a closer view:
jewels happyworld 404 close DSC_0306
(Radiant Banner CG446 by Hero Arts stamped in Stephanie Bernard ColorBox Banana ink; Sentiment by Hero Arts stamped in Wet Cement.)

Thanks for coming by. Hope you are having a Fabulous Friday!

Another from the Vault

Who knew cleaning could be such fun? Here are some more cards made years ago, when I first started stamping:

When shadow stamping first came into fashion, I thought it was the greatest technique because it was so quick and easy. I first learned the technique through Hero Arts when the company introduced solid stamps in various sizes and shapes, and also ink that was soft and mat and perfect as a base. (I’ll be blogging soon about the newest Hero Arts stamps that harken back to shadow stamping! Or check out the Hero Arts Web site and look at Shari Carroll’s video.)

archives 416 best fishes DSC_0421

The shadow stamps are definitely Hero Arts, as are the inks. The fish is from Maryse Carrier, who once designed for Magenta. I was thrilled to find out that her designs are now being carried at Stampotique! Do check them out. I had forgotten how fun and whimsical her designs are, so I’ll be digging out more of those oldies from my collection.

archives 416 abstract judikins shadow DSC_0407

This one is all Judikins (except the sentiment, which I believe is Hero Arts.) The background is a fun retro block with four images on one block; the abstract was black embossed and colored with watercolors.

News You Can Use

Earlier this year I made two jewelry pieces to be donated to a journalism group for a fundraising event.

spj newsy jewelry 411 DSC_0318

I used newspaper stories and headlines to create the background on Formica chips, sealed with Mod Podge. When the Mod Podge was dry I used a VersaMark pen on the edges, then added gold embossing powder. And finally, some beads and gems.

Naturally, I needed something cool to hold them, so I fashioned these recycled gift boxes from a box that held soap:

spj newsy gift boxes 411 DSC_0316

Again, I covered the box with newspaper (hey, this was for a bunch of journalists!) and punched a hole in the sides for a ribbon. But the most fun was the flower, made with the Tim Holtz Tattered Flower die (Sizzix) and, you guess it, newspaper. I spritzed the flower with Ranger’s Perfect Pearls (I think gold and another color… I’m so bad at remembering.)

Here’s a close-up of the flower:

spj newsy flower detail 411 DSC_0319

Thanks for swingin’ by!

More From The Vault

Last week I shared some cards I made a megatrillion years ago … here are a few more:

archives 418 postage DSC_0402

How’s that for heavy masking? Back in the day, “postal” images were all the rage. And obviously, I had just learned how to mask! (Masking is a technique used to put one image behind another. You stamp your foreground image, then stamp it again on scrap paper. Cut out the scrap paper image, cutting a little inside the line. Use that to cover or “mask” the foreground image, then stamp another image over it. The second image will appear behind the first. Make sense? If you stamp your mask on a sticky note or use repositionable glue, then it won’t shift when you stamp over it. Tip o’ day!) (Most of those postal images are from Rubber Stamp Avenue, which is still around and still has fun stuff. The ink is Kaleidacolor from Tsukineko — a fast way to add color.)

Here’s when I learned how to stamp a scene:

archives 418 beach scene DSC_0404
I haven’t stamped a scene in ages! I should dig out those old stamps and try again.

And my early infatuation with heat embossing (a life-changing event!):

archives 418 ballerina DSC_0400
(Images from Judikins.)

Thanks for stopping by!

Cards from the Vault

Yes, once again I am in cleaning mode. (This is a life-long project.)

This time, I cleaned out an old box of cards. Many of these were made when I first started stamping, back in the day when dinosaurs walked the earth.

Let’s open the vault and take a look. See if you remember any of these techniques:

archives 412 metallic flowers DSC_0398

Remember old school dry embossing on metal? I think the process I used here involved stamping the image (Lucy’s stamps) on the back of a foil sheet then going over the lines using a stylus. I can’t remember what I used to color the flowers, but it must have been paint or markers because alcohol ink and Distress markers were not around then!

And remember when dark cardstock was all the rage? (Oy, I still have a ton of it….)

archive 412 haiku bunny DSC_0396

Oh, how I adored (wait…I still adore this image!) this Haiku Bunny from Hero Arts! In fact, I may pull it out and use it on something today!

Then there was the stipple background technique:

archive 413 uncle enos DSC_0391

The “Uncle Enos” image (from River City Rubberworks — they have some hilarious stamps, check them out) was stamped in black then masked using a torn piece of paper. The background stamp (A Stamp In the Hand) was stamped, then the mask removed and I stippled on various colors (I think from a Tsukineko Autumn Kaleidacolor ink pad). The fine bristles of a stipple brush leave a cool textured look.

Hope you had fun with this stroll down memory lane. My next peek into the vault will feature “shadow” stamping — when it was first introduced.
Thanks for stopping by!

Living on the Edge

In my last Fabulous Finds Friday post I worked with Spellbinders’ 3D M-Bossibilities dies. Today, I played with edge-cutting dies — such fun!

Check it out:

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How fun is that?

Here is a finished card:

spellbind 415 border pinwheel DSC_0387
(Cardstock from Stampin’ Up; Hero Arts pinwheels stamped and embossed on scrap paper, finished with rhinestones; sentiment from Hero Arts, edged with Stampin’ Up True Thyme ink and attached with a Ranger Tiny Attacher.)

For the pink card, I tried a different border. At first, I was going to just leave the border as it was, an open-cut. But when the card was closed, it was hard to see the pretty cut-out. (Also, some of the edges were fragile!)

spellbind border pink detail DSC_0355

So I added a strip of off-white card stock underneath:

spellbind 415 border pink hearts DSC_0384

(The hearts are Hero Arts images left over from my wild Valentine’s Day stamping and embossing spree!)

Thanks for coming back!

Fabulous Finds Friday — Spellbinders 3D Dies

Who doesn’t like a deep impression? I’m sure by now you’ve heard of the new 3D M-Bossabilities deep impressions embossing folders from Spellbinders. This is dry embossing at its deepest, giving your cards an almost sculpted look.

(For a recap on these embossing folders, check out this post here There is also a link to a great video.)

The folders are made to snap apart for easy inking for a debossed, letterpress-like look.

Here are two embossed pieces made from the same folder (E3D-004):

Spellbind 3D 414 detail DSC_0350

The pink sample was made using the regular embossing technique on a shimmer pink paper (source unknown.) The yellow was created using a debossing method. I inked the plate using ColorBox Butter Chalk Ink. Can you see how it is pressed into the paper?

Here are two cards made using these pieces:

spellbind 414 3D pink DSC_0388

(Other Spellbinders dies: Antique Frame & Accents and the cut/fold/tuck die, which was attached with a pop-up Glue Dot for added dimension. And a rhinestone. Can’t forget the rhinestone!)

I cut the yellow, debossed piece and got enough for three cards. Here’s just one:

spellbin 414 3D hello green DSC_0390

(The frame, from Close To My Heart, was stamped and heat embossed using American Crafts’ Zing apricot powder; the background wood grain stamp and the sentiment are from Hero Arts.)

Thanks for stopping by! Next up is a look at some edge-cutting dies.